Built and cultural heritage in the Faughan Valley

The Faughan Valley area has a rich collection of archaeological sites and a strong cultural heritage, the variety of sites range from Neolithic megaliths, to Bronze Age and Iron Age monuments and settlements to post-medieval Plantation Bawns.  A great many of these sites are located in upland regions adjacent to the valley floor.  The ancient peoples who lived in the Faughan Valley would have located their religious and burial sites in upland regions overlooking the valley for religious and strategic/territorial purposes.  The forested nature of the lowland region at the time would also have been a reason for locating these sites in the upland regions which commanded a wide view of the valley. 

The Faughan Valley is significant in terms of standing stones, orthostats, liths or more commonly, megaliths, which because of their large and cumbersome size, are solitary stones set vertically in the ground and come in many different varieties. Standing stones are usually difficult to date as there can range in date from the Neolithic period through to the Iron Age.  There are a number of standing stones in the Faughan Valley area, one of which is Cregg Standing Stone outside Claudy, a magnificent quartz boulder 1.8 m high.
 
There are also numerous raths or ringforts within the landscape of the Faughan Valley and adjacent upland regions.  These raths are the remains of settlements and enclosures used by the people who settled in the area from the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age.

On Slievegore Hill, in the upland area to the east of the River Faughan, lies a remarkable concentration of prehistoric monuments, ranging in date from 4000 to 1000BC, known as the Ballygroll Prehistoric Complex. They include a court tomb, two wedge tombs, a round cairn, a barrow and two stone circles set within the remains of the pre-bog field system. This site is managed by Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) and is of great archaeological significance.

At Killaloo there are the remains of Brackfield Bawn, a fortified Plantation Bawn built by Sir Edward Doddington in the early 17th century on lands granted to the Skinners' Company of London as part of the Plantation of Ulster. The house and bawn were abandoned around 1700 but remains an impressive local feature.  Other significant built heritage features in the area include Learmount Castle, Cumber House and Ling House.

The Faughan Valley area has a rich collection of archaeological sites and a strong cultural heritage, the variety of sites range from Neolithic megaliths, to Bronze Age and Iron Age monuments and settlements to post-medieval Plantation Bawns.  A great many of these sites are located in upland regions adjacent to the valley floor.  The ancient peoples who lived in the Faughan Valley would have located their religious and burial sites in upland regions overlooking the valley for religious and strategic/territorial purposes.  The forested nature of the lowland region at the time would also have been a reason for locating these sites in the upland regions which commanded a wide view of the valley. 

The Faughan Valley is significant in terms of standing stones, orthostats, liths or more commonly, megaliths, which because of their large and cumbersome size, are solitary stones set vertically in the ground and come in many different varieties. Standing stones are usually difficult to date as there can range in date from the Neolithic period through to the Iron Age.  There are a number of standing stones in the Faughan Valley area, one of which is Cregg Standing Stone outside Claudy, a magnificent quartz boulder 1.8 m high.
 
There are also numerous raths or ringforts within the landscape of the Faughan Valley and adjacent upland regions.  These raths are the remains of settlements and enclosures used by the people who settled in the area from the Stone Age, Bronze Age and Iron Age.

On Slievegore Hill, in the upland area to the east of the River Faughan, lies a remarkable concentration of prehistoric monuments, ranging in date from 4000 to 1000BC, known as the Ballygroll Prehistoric Complex. They include a court tomb, two wedge tombs, a round cairn, a barrow and two stone circles set within the remains of the pre-bog field system. This site is managed by Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) and is of great archaeological significance.

At Killaloo there are the remains of Brackfield Bawn, a fortified Plantation Bawn built by Sir Edward Doddington in the early 17th century on lands granted to the Skinners' Company of London as part of the Plantation of Ulster. The house and bawn were abandoned around 1700 but remains an impressive local feature.  Other significant built heritage features in the area include Learmount Castle, Cumber House and Ling House.