Project Reference A-1 : Woodland Creation

The Faughan Valley has been described as a honey pot for ancient woodland, albeit small fragmented areas. Ancient woodland is the UK’s most precious natural heritage. These woods are the UK’s equivalent of the rain forest, providing the richest habitat for biodiversity and taking centuries to evolve – making them irreplaceable. Ancient woodland is our only link with the forests that once covered the UK. Very little of our original forests remain and that which does is now fragmented, isolating and threatening the survival of many of our rarest and most immobile native plant and animal species. We can never replace the ancient woods that have been destroyed, but we can buffer, extend and protect what is left.

The Woodland Trust aims to create a minimum of 100ha of woodland within the Faughan Valley Landscape Scale area, protecting and buffering fragmented pockets of ancient woodland, and creating access corridors between them for both the public and wildlife.

To achieve the 100ha Woodland Trust will be encouraging land owners and community groups to plant native woodland. Woodland Trust will be offering to plant and establish these areas for free, by availing of the Forest Service’s Woodland Grant Scheme, which will cover the cost of planting and establishment of the trees for the first five years.  Landowners will also be offered a grant for livestock, rabbit and deer protection, these will include improvement to fencing around areas to be planted, installation of tree guards and canes, the landowner will be asked to make a 50% contribution towards the cost of tree guards and fencing. There will be an opportunity to acquire woodland wildflower bulb packs (sufficient bulbs to get a small area of wildflowers established within the planted area).

In order to protect the areas that are planted the Landscape Partnership Scheme will aim to run a series of training courses that will teach interested landowners and community groups about woodland establishment, from the basics of learning to plant a tree, its aftercare, getting native woodland flowers established and managing the woodland to benefit the ground flora, such as encouraging ancient woodland ground flora to spread into neighbouring woodland creation. Other elements of the training will include noxious/invasive weed control and utilising native woodland for recreational and economic benefit.

To encourage the local community to plant trees Woodland Trust will be offering tree packs to schools and community groups within the area. There will be several pack sizes available, a 30 tree/native hedge pack that will be offered to schools, and then a ¼ acre pack (105 trees) and an acre pack (420 trees) that will be offered to community groups.

The LPS will also hold a number of woodland creation focused events throughout the lifetime of the project, these will include tree planting, nature detectives and seed collection.

The Faughan Valley has been described as a honey pot for ancient woodland, albeit small fragmented areas. Ancient woodland is the UK’s most precious natural heritage. These woods are the UK’s equivalent of the rain forest, providing the richest habitat for biodiversity and taking centuries to evolve – making them irreplaceable. Ancient woodland is our only link with the forests that once covered the UK. Very little of our original forests remain and that which does is now fragmented, isolating and threatening the survival of many of our rarest and most immobile native plant and animal species. We can never replace the ancient woods that have been destroyed, but we can buffer, extend and protect what is left.

The Woodland Trust aims to create a minimum of 100ha of woodland within the Faughan Valley Landscape Scale area, protecting and buffering fragmented pockets of ancient woodland, and creating access corridors between them for both the public and wildlife.

To achieve the 100ha Woodland Trust will be encouraging land owners and community groups to plant native woodland. Woodland Trust will be offering to plant and establish these areas for free, by availing of the Forest Service’s Woodland Grant Scheme, which will cover the cost of planting and establishment of the trees for the first five years.  Landowners will also be offered a grant for livestock, rabbit and deer protection, these will include improvement to fencing around areas to be planted, installation of tree guards and canes, the landowner will be asked to make a 50% contribution towards the cost of tree guards and fencing. There will be an opportunity to acquire woodland wildflower bulb packs (sufficient bulbs to get a small area of wildflowers established within the planted area).

In order to protect the areas that are planted the Landscape Partnership Scheme will aim to run a series of training courses that will teach interested landowners and community groups about woodland establishment, from the basics of learning to plant a tree, its aftercare, getting native woodland flowers established and managing the woodland to benefit the ground flora, such as encouraging ancient woodland ground flora to spread into neighbouring woodland creation. Other elements of the training will include noxious/invasive weed control and utilising native woodland for recreational and economic benefit.

To encourage the local community to plant trees Woodland Trust will be offering tree packs to schools and community groups within the area. There will be several pack sizes available, a 30 tree/native hedge pack that will be offered to schools, and then a ¼ acre pack (105 trees) and an acre pack (420 trees) that will be offered to community groups.

The LPS will also hold a number of woodland creation focused events throughout the lifetime of the project, these will include tree planting, nature detectives and seed collection.